Pele: Hawaii Fire Goddess

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The_goddess_pele_by_arthur_johnsen

Pele by Arthur Johnsen

In Hawaiʻi, the name Pele evokes images of molten lava, flame, and boiling oceans. Pele is a powerful and volatile creator, known as Pelehonuamea (“Pele of the sacred land”) and ka wahine ʻai honua (“the woman who devours the land”). Through her destructive power, Pele is responsible for creating and shaping the landscape of the Hawaiian Islands in an ongoing cycle of devastation and regeneration. Continue reading

A Call to Alarm in Hawaii

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Missile alert HawaiiOn Saturday, January 13, an erroneous alert about a ballistic middle inbound for Hawaiʻi created public fear and confusion. This personal essay isn’t our usual type of content at The Supernatural Fox Sisters, though dealing with a potential missile threat was certainly a spooky situation.

Sleeping in on Saturday morning in Hawaiʻi—sounds lovely, doesn’t it? To many it evokes images of palm trees gently swaying outside the window as waves are heard crashing in the distance. When you finally venture outside you feel the hot sun on your face and hear the birds singing in the trees. Our most recent Saturday in Hawaiʻi was a very different experience. Continue reading

The Mysterious Menehune of Hawaii

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stone-statues

Stone Menehune statue

In Hawaiʻi, tales of the little people known as the Menehune have been passed down through generations. Stories of these mysterious folk can be found in ancient Hawaiian mythology and through more recent accounts. Menehune live in deep mountain forests and secret valleys, staying hidden from the modern world. Though tales of the Menehune are known throughout Hawaiʻi, they’re most associated with the island of Kauaʻi. Continue reading

Honolulu Supernatural Con: 5 Things to Know Before SPNHon 2017

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Bobby in Heaven Supernatural Inside Man

Coming to sunny Honolulu for the Supernatural convention November 17–19, 2017? The fun of a Supernatural convention at the beautiful Hilton Hawaiian Village hotel sounds like heaven, doesn’t it? Perhaps it depends on your individualized version of Heaven. Creation Entertainment has scheduled a Salute to Supernatural convention in Hawaiʻi for the first time, so there’s a lot to be excited about. Tickets have already gone on sale. Don’t wait, because as Lucifer warned us, “He who hesitates, disintegrates.” Continue reading

Monster of the Week: Kupua

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Kupua are Hawaiian demigods with shape-shifting abilities. Due to their transformative abilities and supernatural powers, kupua are described variously as heroes, monsters, or tricksters. Some kupua are known to be destructive and vindictive, with a tendency to kill or devour their enemies. There have also been accounts kupua acting benevolently as kindly spirits watching over their family members or helping the maka`ainana (common people). Kupua are known throughout the Hawaiian islands.

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Monster of the Week: Kasha

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Kaibutsu Ehon (Illustrated Book of Monsters), illustrated by Nabeta Gyokuei, 1881.

Kasha (火車) are a Japanese yōkai that bring the bodies of miscreants to hell as punishment for a life of evil deeds. Kasha are feline demons who are human-sized or larger and walk upright. When Kasha seek to make themselves known, they may be surrounded by flames and their arrival may be signified by the presence of thunder and strong winds. Thus, a Kasha’s appearance will often coincide with stormy weather. When Kasha wish to remain hidden, they can disguise themselves as ordinary cats and live among humans. Kasha prefer the night, just as their mortal feline cousins do.

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Monster of the Week: Night Marchers

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Taken near Punchbowl, 2013, by jai Mansson on Flickr. (CC2.0)

Taken near Nuuanu–Punchbowl, Honolulu, 2013, by jai Mansson on Flickr, CC2.0

Night Marchers (huaka’i pō) are spirits of ancient Hawaiian warriors. Though there are those who describe experiences with huaka’i pō, they are infrequently witnessed from close proximity because most who come into contact with them are cursed. Most experiences with Night Marchers involve hearing drums or chants in the distance or seeing their torches far off across a valley, because those familiar with their mana will seek refuge if huaka’i pō are near.

They proceed from the mountain down to the ocean, following ancient paths that take the marchers from their burial sites to previous battlegrounds and other sacred places. Night Marchers may carry the archaic weaponry and wear the regalia of their corporeal time. Huaka’i pō may have the ability to affect their physical environment, because though they are known to float a few inches above the ground, they sometimes leave behind footprints. Continue reading